Wednesday, July 30, 2008

and the hits just keep coming...

I think the next "big review" is going to be the Kevin Bacon-starring "Death Wish" rip-off "Death Sentance," which sucks bad in a pretty entertaining way. In the meantime, here are some more Deadshot pages from Suicide Squad, issues 49 and 50. These come from the period after Captain Boomerang got Floyd/Deadshot's costume (uniform?) at the airport, when Deadshot just went around in normal clothes for awhile. Issue 50 has a great cover, with Deadshot (in costume) and the rest of the squad as zombies (unfortunately this never actually happens, but it's still a cool image).
Meanwhile, over on my other blog Modern Products, we're counting down to Sunday, which begins to 13 weeks of Halloween- 13 weeks of all scary/spooky/horror etc. themed music. As usual, I am to dig up some of the strangest and most obscure postpunk, dark punk, early goth and deathrock, along with some new wave surprises, movie radio spots, soundtrack selections and tons of other treats. It's a great way to start gearing up for the Halloween season (starting October 1st, we'll probably be doing another 31 days of Halloween on Negative Pleasure). Modern Products airs Sundays from 4-6pm on East Village Radio and can also be downloaded as a podcast...
Back in Deadshot-world, I think that there will be three more posts of Suicide Squad stuff and then another couple of Deadshot-related posts before I move on to one of my other favorite characters, the Spectre. I could keep going with Deadshot for a while, but I think it'd be cooler to get into something new, keep things active, fresh, whatever, and I can always come back to Deadshot later on, yeah?
Anyways, here's the comics...

Issue 50, written by John Ostrander & Kim Yale, art by Luke McDonnell & Geof Isherwood...



Issue 50, written by John Ostrander & Kim Yale, art by Luke McDonnell, Geof Isherwood, Karl Kesel & Grant Miehm, cover by Isherwood & Kesel...



Dig it, for now...

Sunday, July 27, 2008

oh wow, now shit just got real...

Whoa, there's a seriously bumper crop of awesome film screenings coming up in NYC over the next couple of months. I guess it's that time of year...Anyway, I figured I'd share some highlights with you, cuz why not? Maybe we can meet up in the back row and hold hands or whatever...

Branded to Kill

Walter Reade has a Lindsay Anderson series August 15-21, but even better is their Japanese Screen Classics retro which has three films each by Seijun Suzuki (including the utterly mind-blowing Branded to Kill, one of my all-time favorite films), Akira Kurosawa (including the noir-ish Stray Dog, another of my faves), Nagisa Oshima, Shohei Imamura, Kon Ichikawa and others. Highlights include the aforementioned Branded to Kill and Stray Dog, Suzuki's Tokyo Drifter and Zigeunerweisen, Rashomon, Kaneto Shindo's Onibaba and Imamura's Vengeance is Mine. This series is tops, and Walter Reade is really kind of the best theatre in town, so dig it.

Tokyo Drifter

BAM has an Elliot Gould series with some of the actor's great 1970s flicks (Robert Altman's Long Goodbye [another of my favorite films] and California Split, Alan Arkin's Little Murders, scripted by Jules Feiffer) and a handful of more obscure titles from the era (Peter Hyams' Busting, Mel Stuart's I Love My Wife, Ingmar Bergman's the Touch). That runs August 1-21. From August 25-27, they're showing films with one of my favorite actors, the late Richard Widmark. At three days, this one is WAY too short. Screening are Sam Fuller's Hell and High Water, Jules Dassin's Night & the City and William Keighley's Street with No Name. The last two are generally pretty classic films noirs, the Fuller film I've never seen (it's a war picture), but it's Fuller so I'm sure it's entertaining. From September 1-4 BAM is doing a short John Carpenter retrospect with some of the director's best, including Escape from New York, the Thing, Big Trouble in Little China and They Live. Then, September 15-30, they're doing a series of Howard Hawks (a big influence on Carpenter, by the way), which has a pretty diverse mix of comedies, crime flicks, war films and westerns (mostly comedies).

The Long Goodbye

Film Forum is one of my least favorite theatres in the city- it's just so damned uncomfortable and the audiences can be kind of annoying, but they still put on some great series and offer alot of 2-for-1 double features. From August 8 through early September they've got a French crime series with tons of great stuff, including some of the usual suspects (Godard, Melville, Chabrol, Clouzot, Bresson's Pickpocket-one of the best movies ever made?- and a Man Escaped) plus some rarities including a double bill of Alain Corneau films including the little seen Jim Thompson adaptation Serie Noire, plus a bunch of titles from the 1940s and 50s that look pretty interesting.

Pickpocket

MOMA has most of the Coen bros' movies and some early Fellini, plus a series of films with (yawn) jazz scores (including Polanski's Repulsion) and films by Dali's "Three American Surrealists"- the Marx bros, Cecil B. DeMille & Walt Disney. On the one hand, there's nothing really wrong with any of these series, on the other hand they're kind of uninspired, which is probably why I haven't been to the new MOMA screening room yet.

Maniac Cop

Anthology Film Archives has Tarkovsky, Chaplin, the Dardenne brothers, and a couple of nights of NYC crime flicks (Bill Lustig's Maniac Cop, Maniac Cop 2 and Vigilante!, Abel Ferrara's Ms. 45 and Michael Winner's Death Wish) in August, plus Laurel & Hardy, Jerry Schtzberg, Jack Smith's Flaming Creatures, Robert Downey Sr.'s Chafed Elbows and films by Warhol, Jean Vigo and Vertov in September.

Ms. 45

The Landmark Sunshine cinema used to have some pretty exciting midnight movies on the weekends, but they've become increasingly dull over the years. Upcoming highlights include the awful Wicker Man remake, Tron and a Wizard of Oz sing-a-long. If you don't mind smelly theatres and snarky ushers, check 'em out.


The IFC has some much better midnight shows coming up, including a veritable cornucopia of 1960s counterculture exploitation pix including Riot on Sunset Strip with the Standells and the Chocolate Watchband (August 1-2), Lord Love a Duck with the bodacious Tuesday Weld (August 8-9), Psych-Out by Richard Rush (August 15-16) and Roger Corman's the Trip (September 26-27). On weekend mornings they've got Ingmar Bergman films and in forthcoming general release, Claude Chabrol's new film and screenings of Dreyer's Day of Wrath.

Lord Love a Duck

So, if like me, you prefer spending your summer someplace cool, dark and indoors instead of going off to the beach with all the jerks, maybe I'll catch you at one or two of these shows, whatever I can afford really, which is currently not much, but some of these are totally can't-miss, especially for all you negative pleasure-ites. It's so much better than reality...

Saturday, July 26, 2008

shit just got real...

I came to "Bad Boys 2" in kind of a roundabout way. It's not really the kind of movie I'd think to watch on my own, I don't know if it's something I'd specifically avoided, or something I'd just never thought of. Actually, I'd only seen my first Michael Bay movie (the first "Bad Boys") about a week earlier, so I had no real opinion of him, again, just the kind of filmmaker I'd never really thought about, he just doesn't make the kind of movies I watch. And I have nothing really specific against starts Will Smith and Martin Lawrence. Sure, they may both be kind of hackey, and formerly the starts of some pretty bad sitcoms, but both have a few gems under their belts. Smith, who I actually find reasonably charismatic as a performer (and from what little I know about him personally, seems like actually a nice guy), was in "Six Degrees of Separation" and the "Men in Black" films, which I thought were good enough. Lawrence was in "Do the Right Thing" and the first two "House Party" movies before joining Eddie Murphy in the drag & fat suit set.

Anyway, I'd still never have seen "Bad Boys 2" had it not been for "Hot Fuzz," the most recent of the Edgar Wright- Simon Pegg- Nick Frost collabs (after "Spaced" and "Hot Fuzz"- "Spaced" by the way just came out on DVD in the states for the first time, exciting). In this almost painfully perfect and consistently hilarious police parody (which features some of the most ingenious editing in any film I've ever seen), sidekick Nick Frost plays a smalltown cop obsessed with American cop cinema, in particular Kathryn Bigelow's "Point Break" (which I've really, really tried to like, being a fan of Bigelow's "Loveless," "Near Dark," and "Blue Steel," but find generally pretty boring) and "Bad Boys 2." Both films are referenced and quoted repeatedly hilariously, and "Hot Fuzz's" take on BB2, along with some other opinions I'd heard, suggested that it was just the kind of bad movie I could really sink my teeth into.

Hot Fuzz

It is. Oh, yea, it really, really is. "Bad Boys 2" may trump "Domino" as the worst-best movie I've ever seen. It seems to have been conceived (by writers Ron Shelton and Jerry "Cafe Flesh/Alf/somehow got a shitty movie made about his drug habit" Stahl) not just on another planet, but on another planet on another dimension, where basic human logic and the politics of everyday life veer off in the most bizarre and unexpected of directions. Nothing in "Bad Boys 2" makes any kind of logical sense in any way, shape or form. The film itself doesn't even really have any internal logic, except that anything that happens need ultimately lead to a car chase that in turn must lead to a gunfight.

Cafe Flesh

In fact, by human logic, the characters played by Lawrence and Smith are possibly the two worst cops ever. Every thing they try to do- which never involves trying to get warrants or doing any actual policework- they fuck up, and it all ends in a car chase and then a gunfight. Seriously, it happens like five times, they set out to do something that's pretty much illegal anyway, it all goes wrong, car chase, gunfight. A bunch of times, I'd turn to say something to my friend, or just space out for a second, and I'd look back at the TV, and there'd be a chase going on, and I'd have no idea how it started. Meanwhile, all the chases and shootouts are so excessive, culminating in Smith and Lawrence chasing a morgue truck that has corpses spilling out of it and onto the highway, getting crushed and decapitated under the wheels of cars. "Bad Boys 2" reverts to this kind of gruesome slapstick on a number of occasions, and it actually works counterproductive to the overall veneer of seriousness, because despite the casting of two comedians in the leads, and their occasional bickering riffing, this film takes itself surprisingly seriously, which is funny in part because it's about the trafficking of exstasy, a drug I don't think is really as dangerous or addictive as heroin or cocaine, the latter of which they probably couldn't get because it's pretty evident that between this film and "Domino," filmmakers Michael Bay and Tony Scott did all of it. Probably off the asses of underage hookers. The other serious the veneer of self-importance amuses is because this film is easily the most ridiculous piece of shit I've ever seen.

What else? Lawrence's character, despite living on a policeman's salary, lives in a mansion. In one really oddly meant-to-be-comic scene, Lawrence also accidentally ingests some X tablets and gets like all high and stuff. It's like sitcom level humor- the pills fly across the room and land in his water glass. Oh, and the scene takes place in a morgue, and Lawrence just like picks up this glass and starts drinking out of it. In a morgue. With dead bodies. Just some random glass that happened to be sitting there. Like, in a morgue. Smith, meanwhile, has a different car in every scene, including a couple of Ferraris and some kind of concept car. His character has a trust fund, you see. So he has multiple Ferraris. Also, what kind of cops are Smith and Lawrence supposed to be anyway? They're going after drugs, gangsters, the Klan, invading Cuba...and they never seem to actually arrest anyone anyway, since they always pretty much just shoot people. And I know this isn't supposed to be a realistic expose of police procedure, but they really seem to bend the rules to the point where they'd probably have long since been kicked off the police force or arrested themselves for gross abuses of suspects' civil rights (kind of ironic for a film about two African-American policemen, and also horrifying).

The list goes on and on. There's a whole subplot at the beginning of the film about Lawrence going through therapy, anger management and some kind of new age men's movement hug therapy stuff, which we discover his and Smith's boss, played by Joe Pantaliano, is also involved in, but it never really goes anywhere. Oh yeah, "Bad Boys 2" is like 2 and a half hours long, so it cycles through several phases of underdeveloped subplots before the main characters, along with a cadre of previously unrevealed Navy SEAL, invade Cuba, which leads to another carchase, cultimating a shootout at the gates of Guantanamo, which is kind of fucked, just generally. There's some other stuff too, that I'm not thinking of. Oh yeah, Lawrence's sister, who is also Smith's girlfriend, is played by Gabrielle Union, and she's supposed to be this high ranking DEA agent, except she's like 20. Oh, and there's also Bug/Let's Go to Prison/Jesus' Son's Michael Shannon as a comic-relief Klan member (because, really, what's funnier than the KKK?) and Fargo/Bruiser's Peter Stomare as an inept Russian gangster.

"Shit just got real."

I really wish I could accurately convey the levels of insanity and inanity that this film reaches, it's wholly a cinematic entity unto itself, slick, stupid and strange and I gotta say, fun as hell. Even so, director Michael Bay and producer Jerry Bruckheimer are clearly two of the most horrible people in Hollywood and seem not only to have no regard for the concept of cinema as art, but seem to be actively working to destroy it. So, y'know, fuck 'em. But seriously, "Bad Boys 2" is a trip.

Hot Fuzz (Nick Frost & Simon Pegg)

Meanwhile, watch "Hot Fuzz." It doesn't provide the immediate identification found in "Spaced" or "Shaun of the Dead," but it's just as funny, maybe funnier, than either. Meanwhile, I've finally caught up on my favorite UK sitcom "Peep Show" (costarring Olivia Coleman of "Hot Fuzz") which just finished it's fifth season, and, wow, talk about only theatre of pain. I'm rewatching the first four seasons and maybe I'll write something, but if you can get your hands on this stuff, watch it early and often.

Peep Show (David Mitchell & Robert Webb)

Friday, July 25, 2008

a barber does a lot of work around the back of the neck...

As I gather my wits and prepare myself emotionally and psychologically to tackle a review of one of the most bizarre movies I've ever seen- "Bad Boys 2" (or "Michael Bay Does Cocaine")- here are some more Deadshot images from the later issues of Suicide Squad. There's some good stuff here, starting in issue 43, with Deadshot nearly assassinating his Suicide Squad boss, Amanda Waller, but deciding not to because she offers him a dollar more than his contractors. This really kind of gets to the essence of the character- he sort of doesn't give a fuck, and he sort of does. Like, he wants to do the right thing, but he has to find the dickishest way to do it. Chances are, he would have killed Waller, but in his heart I sort of don't think he'd really want to, since being on the Suicide Squad gives him some purpose in life. Later in the issue, he has another confrontation with Batman, and kind of gets the upper hand this time, verbally, first with some cute smartassery ("He had a gun?") and then with some moral gymnastics (why should act morally when nobody who hires me- namely the government- does?). It's kinda cool to see him have something more clever to say to Batman than," Go to hell," although it's kind of cool when he tells Batman to go to hell too. In Issue 45, meanwhile, Deadshot is traveling with teammate Captain Boomerang, who gets Deadshot/Floyd's luggage lost, which actually becomes a major subplot throughout the rest of the series, as we'll see in future posts- Floyd spends much of the rest of the series out of costume...

Howard McNear as Floyd the Barber

Also, is it just a coincidence that Deadshot is named Floyd Lawton, and the barber on the Andy Griffith Show is Floyd Lawson? The comic book character first appeared in 1950, Floyd the Barber showed up on tv 10 years later. It seems sort of unlikely but not impossible- was Andy Griffith Show producer Sheldon Leonard a comic book reader? Could be have encountered the first Deadshot issue of Batman (59) a decade earlier and subconsciously catalogued the moniker for future use? The world may never know...(both characters also wear pretty boss moustaches)

Eugene Levy as Floyd the Barber on SCTV (Rick Moranis as Merv Griffin)

Issue 43, written by John Ostrander & Kim Yale, art by Geof Isherwood...





Issue 45, Ostrander/Yale/Isherwood...

More to follow....

Tuesday, July 22, 2008

blah blah blah blah bling bling blah...

After "Batman- Goth Knight" I can't help but feel a little treppadacious about my interest in Deadshot. After all, if part of the appeal of the character is his general underexposure, having him in a DVD spin-off to a big budget overrated overhyped big big big ass movie is only going to make people more aware of his existence in the DC universe, and his being a character who just shoot guns and looks cool, the danger of his becoming known to more than just a select few nerds like me...As a friend of mine pointed out, a bad movie appearance can totally kill a good comic book character. Judge Dredd was one of the great sorta postpunk UK comics of the 1980s, but after the substellar (hell, subadequate) Stallone flick (and some comic page overexposure, including a most questionable Batman crossover), nobody cared anymore. Ditto "Tank Girl," which was one of the sassier and more stylish indie comics of the 80s, totally wiped off the map by the unpopular film starring Lori Petty, Naomi Watts and Ice-T as a Kangaroo Man (I liked it, but I'm in the minority, and I even I'll admit it's pretty bad. Actually, I feel pretty much the same way about the "Judge Dredd" movie). So, yeah, what was I talking about?

Anyway, here are some scans from Deadshot's return to the Suicide Squad series in issue 34, basically a year after his last appearance. Still in the insane asylum after his assassination of a corrupt politician in issue 24, team leader Bronze Tiger recruits him to help rescue some of the teammates from Darkseid on Apokalyps in a cool New Gods-Forever People (all Jack Kirby characters) crossover. This lasted through issue 36, with art by John K Snyder III and inks by Geof Isherwood. Luke McDonnell returns as artist for issue 39, with Isherwood still on inks, after which Isherwood took over as main artist of the series for several issues, alternating with McDonnell.

John K Snyder III got his start on the Eclipse title "Scout" with Tim Truman in the mid-1980s, going on to work on Truman's "the Prowler" and Matt Wagner's "Grendel," both also at Eclipse. "Suicide Squad" was his first work for DC, and relatively rare mainstream work for the author, who did an occasional issue for DC or Marvel here and there but has mostly worked on indie titles. His most recent work includes the cover art for DC's "Suicide Squad" revival "Raise the Flag" (yes, featuring Deadshot, we'll get to it eventually).

Isherwood started at Marvel in 1984, mostly working on Conan and Conan-related titles, as well as the occasional issue of "Power Man & Iron Fist," "Daredevil" or "Thor," as well as the "New Universe" titles "Justice" and "Star Brand." He also was inker for many issues of Marvel's non-superhero war title "The 'Nam." Suicide Squad 33, in 1989, was his first work for DC, and he continued to work for both companies throughout the 1990s, which included a long run on "Dr. Strange," then "Namor" (for some reason I almost just wrote 'Booger' instead of 'Namor,' don't ask me why) and eventually more "Conan" for Marvel. As of the 2000s he seems to have mostly retired from comics...I like Isherwood's work quite a bit, it's got kind of a cool Gene Colan quality to it, very atmospheric...

Anyway, enjoy...

Issue 34, written by John Ostrander and Kim Yale, art by John K Snyder III & Geof Isherwood...
Issue 36, written by Ostrander & Yale, art by Snyder & Isherwood...


Issue 39, written by Ostrander & Yale, art by Isherwood...


Issue 40, written by Ostrander & Yale, art by Isherwood...

Issue 41, written by Ostrander & Yale, art by Isherwood...

More to come...

Sunday, July 20, 2008

dragging on and on and on and on and on and on...

The GOOD animated Batman (& friends)...

Last post I mentioned the new Batman- Gotham Knight cartoon (or original animated feature, or whatever) that DC/WB have put out in conjunction with the new live-action fiasco that came out this weekend, and how it features Deadshot as a villain in one of the segments. I got the DVD of this from Netflix this weekend and, I dunno, it's not that bad...I mean, I dunno, it's not as good as "Batman- the Animated Series" from the 1990s (my favorite non-comic book adaptation of the character), but it's certainly decently more enjoyable than most of the movies in the franchise, and I'm included the last joyless Christopher Nolan entry (I haven't seen the new one yet, and honestly don't really care that much). At least the animation medium gives a sense of color, kineticism, if not fun (definitely not fun), then at least...spirit (speaking of which, don't get me started on the film adaptation of Will Eisner's "the Spirit" that's coming out, it looks like an idiotic piece of shit, and will no doubt lack all of the wit, humanity and insight of the original comics, what with it being directed by creepy libertarian ass fetishist Frank Miller) or something...I dunno, it's not so great either, and manages to make a mere hour and fifteen minutes feel like much, much longer. Well, it does sometimes, but, well, whatever, the segments are as follows...

The REAL live-action Batman, motherfucker...

The first segment is a direct rip off one of the best episodes of the animated series (which may or may not have been based on a comic, I'm not sure) which has a bunch of kids recounting their different interpretations of their encounters with the Batman. In the original, these visions are cleverly adaptation from different incarnations of the Batman comic, including the good natured 1950s version, and Miller's dystopian "Batman- the Dark Knight Returns." In this new version, Batman is seen as a shadow creature, a Man-Bat and a robot. It's padded out with skateboarding and were it not for the very unique and attractive animation by Shoji Nishimi, of Tekonkinkreet, it'd be pretty lame. Script, oddly enough, by Josh Olson, who wrote Cronenberg's "History of Violence."

The second section is even more pointless, I suppose attempting to show the Gotham Police department's resentment of Batman. The only thing that I found really interesting is that one of the cops was Crispus Allen, a character from the comics (who has now become the new Spectre- I guess the use of a comic book character in this one would make sense since it's written by Greg Rucka). Animation on this one by Futoshi Higashide.

The third section is genuinely kind of boring. Bruce Wayne goes to visit his weapon's supplier, Lucious Fox, then spends a long time playing golf with some other rich guy. I think ultimate it was supposed to be about Batman learning to use his gear and stuff but I totally lost interest long before he showed up in costume. How come nobody ever makes use of Batman's utility belt anymore? That's always been one of the coolest things about the character, sort of a technological manifestation of his resourcefulness, but the movies and stuff are all about the car and kung-fu. Lame. He's got a whole belt full of neat stuff. Anyway, I think my opening critique of this project overall was a bit overly generous. Animation here by Hiroshi Morioka (Tsubasa Chronicle).

"In Darkness Dwells," the next segment, has a script by David Goyer who wrote both of the new Batman films, as well as the "Blade" films and the awful tv movie version "Nick Fury- Agent of SHIELD," with animation by Yasuro Aoki. It's the first section to feature recognizable villains- Scarecrow and Killer Croc. It also features Batman in the ugly all-black movie-style costume. Croc had a lot of personality in the original animated series (and in the comics), here he's more of a monster. Another thing I don't like about the newer non-comics incarnations of Batman is that they never really dig that the character is supposed to me like a master detective. Instead of detectiving, they always just have him fighting and kung-fu'ing. I've been hearing alot of people call these films, especially the new "Dark Knight," intelligent, but when you take away the most intellectual aspect of the character and replace it with some paper thin goth-emo posturing and loads of fisticuffs, isn't it really being dumbed down from the comics? Also, Batman's grappling gun in this section looks like a dildo.

The next entry is written by overrated comics writer Brian Azzarello, whose 2002 adults only Luke Cage series for Marvel I found to be genuinely kind of racist. He's the kind of writer that aims to "push buttons" but does so in the most obviously, adolescent kind of way. I think he also might have given my the finger at the last New York Comic Con. Anyway, as to be expected, this is among the bloodier episodes. It covers Batman's experiences abroad that helped him become super badass fighter paintaker dude. Yawn. Again, minimal utility belt, no detecting, just fighting and being all pained and dark and tortured and shit. Animation by video game creator Toshiyuki Kubooka.

Finally, after all of it, we get to "Deadshot," by "Spiral Zone" (!) animated Jong-Sik Nam, written by Alan Burnett, the only writer in the bunch to have worked on "Batman- the Animated Series" (as well as "Superman- the Animated Series," "Batman Beyond," "Static Shock" and even "Superfriends"), as such this is easily the best of the bunch, or at least the most recognizably Batman-like. Deadshot is hired to go to Gotham and assassinate Commissioner Gordon, Batman tries to stop him and they fight. Because it's mostly chase and combat, Deadshot doesn't really get much of a chance to shine, character-wise, he comes off pretty generic ("Alright," he says before an assassination attempt," It's showtime!"- really? that's the best you could come up with, guys?). They kind of mess up his costume too, instead of cool like in the comics it looks pretty klunky and just...ugly. I preferred Deadshot's brief appearances on the "Justice League Unlimited" show.

Deadshot, to the extreme, dude...(ugh)

Overall, pretty lame. It may try to do new things with the character, but it does so at the expense of the elements that make Batman most interesting. At the same time, these "new" elements aren't really that new. This is sort of the equivalent of the early-to-mid 1990s when all the comic book companies were angling to make all their characters bigger and badder and darker and more stylish, but stylish in a very transitory, not at all timeless, way. I did enjoy hearing "Batman- the Animated Series" star Kevin Conroy voicing the character once again, but really it wasn't enough to make this a satisfying experience. I worry now that mainstream cinema has gotten hold of comics as a profitable enterprise that we're going to see more and more stuff like this, just totally drained of any and all flavor, devoid of originality and even worse, devoid of any sense of historocity in regards to what makes this genre work. In that respect, I'd really much prefer the campy and supposedly therefore inferior 1960's Adam West version to something like this, because at least that series had a sense of attempting to be a living comic book, and sort of reveled in elements of the medium and genre, and opposed to taking the character and trying to conform it to lame cinematic action-movie standards. On the upside, the DVD has a preview documentary of a new animated Wonder Woman movie that looks more in tune with DC's better animation projects, with a great voice cast including Keri Russell as Wonder Woman, Serenity's Nathan Fillion, Rosario Dawson, Virginia Madsen and Alfred Molina, by "Superman- Doomsday" (which was decent) director Lauren Montgomery...

Well, what would life be without constant dissatisfaction and disappointment? Livable, maybe? I'll never know...

Ooh, he's all fucking tortured and shit. I hear Oscar buzz...