Wednesday, November 28, 2007

tvod


For some reason, and despite the fact that I spent the past four years working on a master's degree in media studies (in addition to an earlier four years, some time ago, spend on an undergraduate degree in film), it's been deeply instilled in me that there's something really shameful about watching television, and even moreso watching and enjoying it. Of course, this is total bullshit, television is so deeply ingrained in so many aspects of our culture, popular or otherwise, people who don't watch are kind of cutting themselves off from a vital lifeline to the collective cultural consciousness. That said, there is also a decent amount of decent material being broadcast on television these days, particularly as network TV responds to the more filmic shows finding popularity on cable. Which is all just a self-indulgent, self-loathing, self-important and roundabout way of saying that I watch TV and I like watching TV. I understand the problems people have with TV and certainly have many problems with TV myself, but also think it's shortsighted to discount an entire medium and cultural phenomenon because, what? The news is biased, sitcoms are stupid and ads try to sell you stuff you don't want or need? People seem to have this view that watching TV entirely diminishes the viewer's ability to think for themselves, which I think speaks more to a privileged, elitist view of the "lower classes," those presumed illiterate masses who turn off their brains as soon as the set goes on. And while I'm there are people like that who exist, I think in essence that viewpoint becomes something of a tool of class oppression, separatism, bigotry...Ok, maybe I'm taking it a bit far, but even so...well, just even so (I notice that lately I've been saying "even so" as an answer to things in and of itself)...
Blah blah blah, what I started out to say was that I was watching the TV show "Pushing Daisies" tonight and I heard the greatest line. One character says something fairly ill-advised, and the person he's talking to responds, "Well, that might make a stupid idea feel better about itself." I dunno, I just thought it was really funny, and also kind of notable in a noirish, hardboiled kind of a way, which I like. I've really been enjoying "Pushing Daisies", by the way, which is not entirely surprising since it was created by Bryan Fuller, who did two of my other favorite shows, "Dead Like Me" and "Wonderfalls," both canceled fairly early one. Hopefully this show will fare better and last longer, as its sort of pleasantly whimsical yet at the same time quite morbid and deep. Anyways, that's all, except, y'know, don't be a fucking snob, watch the Simpsons sometimes or something. It could save us from a class war some day...

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